Tobacco Control Agreement

Missão Batista Internacional Brasileira

Tobacco Control Agreement

18 de dezembro de 2020 Sem categoria 0

Key Outcome Measures The FCTC is an international treaty adopted in 2003, which aims to reduce harmful tobacco consumption and is legally binding on the 181 countries that have ratified it. The main findings were annual national estimates of cigarette use per adult from 71 countries since 1970, which compared pre- and post-2003 levels and trends in pre- and post-2003 consumption at the global, regional and national levels, modeling counterfactual control groups based on the modelling of linear trends in pre-intervention time (STI) and sampling forecasts (for event modeling). Cameroonian Academy of Sciences. A workshop on the dissemination of NASAC`s expert panel on tobacco control in Africa reports to stakeholders in Cameroon. Yaounde; 2014. Journalists and the public were violently removed from the October 2014 convention in Moscow. [27] The Washington Times reported that FCTC delegates were secretly discussing a global tobacco tax. [27] Several interest groups, including academics and activists, have undertaken a concerted effort over more than a decade to advance the WHO treaty despite the counter-marketing of the tobacco industry. Following the adoption of the treaty, Cameroon, Kenya, Nigeria, Malawi, South Africa and Togo responded uniquely to the implementation of tobacco policy, with differences in the country`s socio-economic context, the priorities of the country`s leaders, the presence of the sector and the choice of strategies. All study countries, with the exception of Malawi, have joined and ratified the WHO Convention on Tobacco and implemented tobacco control policy.

Overall, the WHO FCTC is extremely useful in reducing tobacco use and its health effects. Despite considerable opposition from the tobacco industry, it remains the only international health treaty and has achieved international results in reducing noncommunicable NEDAs. It is strongly advised to continue to improve science and practice in the optimal implementation of transnational implementation of international health treaties. Recommendations include: (a) the best way to implement cross-sector measures to ensure that stakeholders are involved and their needs, b) how public service policy makers and organizations can manage tobacco industry engagement and interference, c) how to deal with conflicts of interest within the country. B, for example, how to balance the needs of tobacco benefits for farmers, tax revenues and public health; and (d) how to expand the reach of international health organizations to implement more contracts to improve global health.